NEWS BRIEFS

Defending the bombers

A new Israeli Foreign Ministry study has found that Islamic theologians publicly support and sympathise with suicide bombers, a factor which could legitimise such acts and result in an increase in attacks. "Because suicide is prohibited in Islam--as it is in Judaism-- religious leaders do not use the term 'suicide' but 'martyrdom'," the study found. It quoted several clerics, including Sheikh Mohammed Sa'ad Tantawi of Cairo, who said: "One who blows himself up among enemies, to defend his land, is considered a martyr." Since April 1993, 162 people (not including the perpetrators) have been killed and more than 1068 wounded in 20 suicide bombings.

'Revoke Arafat's peace prize'

Opponents of Oslo have instituted a campaign to urge the Nobel committee to revoke the award of its 1994 peace prize to PLO chairman Yasser Arafat. Nobel award committee member Kaare Kristiansen, who resigned from the committee to protest the decision to award the 1994 prize to Arafat, has joined the campaign. Acknowledging that the revoking of an award was unprecedented, the Alliance said, however, that Arafat's "continued complicity in acts of barbaric slaughter ... surely warrants an unprecedented sanction If the award to Arafat is not revoked, the Nobel Prize process will forever, in the eyes of history, be defiled." For more, email the Jewish Action Alliance, at:

JWALLIANCE@aol.com

Remember?

On July 5, 1975, Mustafa Liftawi (Abu Firas) planted a bomb in Zion Square in Jerusalem, killing 14 people. Liftawi, a senior member of the military wing of Yasser Arafat's Fatah faction of the PLO, is today governor of Ram'Allah, a PA-controlled town on the northern outskirts of Jerusalem. One of his tasks, ostensibly, is to combat Islamic terrorism. Numerous attacks have occurred near, or been linked to, Ram'Allah.

Munich outrage remembered

On September 5, mourners marked the 25th anniversary of the PLO Black September faction's murder of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes in Munich, Germany. The widow of one of the victims, fencing coach Andre Spitzer, criticised officials in Germany and Israel for not finding all of the perpetrators and those behind the attack. "We will not rest until all those responsible are brought to justice," Ankie Rekhess-Spitzer told the gathering. The athletes were seized by eight terrorists, and after a 20-hour standoff, a botched rescue effort by the Germans resulted in their deaths. A German officer and five of the terrorists were also killed. The Mossad methodically hunted down and reportedly killed some PLO men responsible, but at least two of them, Amin al-Hindi and Mohammed Daoud Mahmoud Audu (Abu Daoud) are alive and well in the PA zone: Daoud lives in Ram'Allah, and Major-General Al-Hindi heads the PA general intelligence service. When asked about Hindi's return to Gaza with Israel's approval, then Foreign Minister Shimon Peres replied that there was no Jewish blood on Hindi's hands, since he had only planned the 1972 Munich operation (The Jerusalem Post, July 14, 1994).

Palestinians 'most policed people on earth'

For every 45 people living under Yasser Arafat's Palestinian Authority, there is one PA "policeman". Speaking on a recent America Online interactive chat, PM Binyamin Netanyahu's advisor David Bar-Illan, said: "The PA and Arafat have the largest police force in the world per capita. It is one policeman for every 45 people. To say that he does not have the power to control terrorism in such a small area and such a small community is to insult the intelligence of every knowledgeable person." Arafat's bloated "police force"--estimates vary between 35,500 and 85,000--is far larger than the 24,000 agreed upon in Oslo.

Security "black hole"

Recent suicide bombing attacks in Jerusalem have exposed an intelligence "black hole" in PA-ruled areas, where Israeli security services cannot depend on their PA counterparts to cooperate in the fight against Islamist terror. While the Israeli government sees collaboration in the security arena as possibly the most important component of the Oslo accords, the PA has made it clear it does not share this view. The network of Arab agents in Judea-Samaria and Gaza, painstakingly built up over the years by Israel, has all but collapsed under Yasser Arafat. Numerous informants have been murdered or jailed. Some have moved to Israel-controlled areas, while others have gone into hiding or cut links with their handlers. On September 10, the Los Angeles Times quoted former Shin Bet (internal security service) head Ya'akov Perry as saying: "The peace process was based on the fact that if we withdrew from the territories, the Palestinian security forces would do the job we've done, and cooperation would bridge the gap ... the fact they are not fighting terrorism, gathering intelligence, arresting people and neutralising [the terror groups], it's a disaster."


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